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Helene Foley
Helene Foley
Professor of Classics, Barnard College
Powerful Women in Greek Tragedy
Powerful Women in Greek Tragedy
Respectable women in classical Athens generally spent their lives within the home, or involved in various religious activities. But when we think of Ancient Greece, the women who come to mind are strong, driven, and commanding: Medea, Clytemnestra, Antigone. Why is it that we find these powerful, articulate female figures on stages throughout Athens when in reality, women did not always play these roles? The male authors of Greek plays created tragedies performed by men for a largely male audience, but featured women who were rebellious and powerful. In this talk, Professor Foley will delve into just how we can account for the striking focus on female acts in Greek drama.
Tarallucci e vino
475 Columbus Avenue
New York, NY 10024, USA
Bio
Helene P. Foley is the author of numerous books and articles on Greek epic and drama, on women and gender in Antiquity, and on modern performance and adaptation of Greek drama. Among her publications, she is the author of Ritual Irony: Poetry and Sacrifice in Euripides, The Homeric Hymn to Demeter, Female Acts in Greek Tragedy, and Reimagining Greek Tragedy on the American Stage, as well as co-author of Women in the Classical World: Image and Text.