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William Sharpe
William Sharpe
Professor of English, Barnard College
A Writer Walks into a Bar: Drinking and Describing in Literary New York
A Writer Walks into a Bar: Drinking and Describing in Literary New York
After a quick run-through of some of the city’s most famous literary watering holes, Professor Sharpe will explore how writers have described what goes on in New York’s bars. Starting with the low-life dives of the 1800s visited by Melville, Whitman, and Dickens, he will look at bars in poetry and prose (and a few jokes). Authors will range from the likes of F. Scott Fitzgerald, e. e. cummings, W. H. Auden, Frank O’Hara, Dorothy Parker, to the ever-popular (and possibly alcoholic) Anonymous: “ I’d rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy.”
Evelyn Drinkery (Age 21+)
171 Avenue C
New York, NY 10009, USA
Bio
William Sharpe specializes in the literature, art, and culture of the modern city, particularly New York. He teaches courses in Victorian and modern literature, and has published numerous books and articles on literature, urban studies, and the visual arts. He has been awarded fellowships from the Mellon Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Prof. Sharpe's latest book on images of New York City at night, called New York Nocturne: The City After Dark in Art, Literature, and Photography (Princeton University Press, 2008) won the Peter S. Rollins Award of the Northeast American Studies Association and the MSA Book Prize of the Modernist Studies Association.